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13 September 2001:
YOO-HOO! PTSC! About those copyrights PART 1
YOO-HOO! PTSC! About those copyrights PART 2
YOO-HOO! PTSC! About those copyrights PART 3
YOO-HOO! PTSC! About those copyrights PART 4

22 August 2001:
Re: Attention Librarian


5 March 2001:
Re: Question for CL or Librarian


10 April 2000:
Part 1, 1972-1973 FIX AND REPOST
Part 1, 1972-1973 FIX AND REPOST (Continued)
Part 2, 1974-1975 FIX AND REPOST
Part 2, 1974-1975 FIX AND REPOST (Continued)
Part 3, 1976-A FIX AND REPOST
Part 4, 1976-B FIX AND REPOST
Part 5, 1977 FIX AND REPOST
Part 6, 1978 FIX AND REPOST
Part 7, 1979-1980 FIX AND REPOST
Part 8, 1981-1982 FIX AND REPOST
Re: Owen, We Have a Problem

3 March 2000:
Re Part 3, 1976-A

25 February 2000:
PGPed Where the heck have *I* been? From 1972 to 1982 and back!

17 January 1999:
THE LIBRARIAN AND THE LIVING DEAD

8 December 1998:
Re: Urgent to Veritas: Marie

18 November 1998:
LIEBERMAN AND THE LIBRARIAN, PART I
LIEBERMAN AND THE LIBRARIAN, PART II
LIEBERMAN AND THE LIBRARIAN, PART III
LIEBERMAN AND THE LIBRARIAN, PART I—CORRECTED

8 October 1998:
A Message and Picture From The ARSCC Librarian

9 April 1998:
ZED'S "DEAR LIBRARIAN" LETTER

4 March 1998:
ZED, HONEY, I'VE GOT WHAT YOU NEED!
Re: The Missing Ten Months


13 January 1998:
THE LIBRARIAN LOSES IT WITH SHERIFF RON

5 January 1998:
Re: ENTHETA.NET archive: The Librarian
Re: Librarian: riddle me this.....

4 January 1998:
Re: Challenge to Critics and Scientologists Alike
LIBRARIAN CALLING JETA!

30 December 1997:
THE LIBRARIAN'S PRESENT TO LITIGANTS

29 December 1997:
THE LIBRARIAN HAS PRESENTS!
PRESENT TO BOOKBUYERS
PRESENT FOR WILLIAM BARWELL
PRESENT FOR RON'S AMIGO
PRESENT FOR JUSTIN

22 December 1997:
LOOK WHAT YOUR LITTLE OL' LIBRARIAN FOUND!

21 December 1997:
THE LIBRARIAN SAYS *NOT* RECOMMENDED READING!

19 December 1997:
jf05353-A THANK-YOU CARD FROM THE LIBRARIAN
ZED STRUGGLES WITH THE LIBRARIAN
SHERIFF RON INTERROGATES THE LIBRARIAN
THE SHERIFF COMES BACK FOR MORE
RE: ZED STRUGGLES WITH THE LIBRARIAN--NOT!
ZED AND THE SHERIFF GANG UP ON THE LIBRARIAN

17 December 1997:
ZED VS. THE LIBRARIAN-1
ZED VS. THE LIBRARIAN-2
ZED VS. THE LIBRARIAN-3
ZED VS. THE LIBRARIAN-4
ZED VS. THE LIBRARIAN-5
ZED VS. THE LIBRARIAN-6
ZED VS. THE LIBRARIAN-7

15 December 1997:
Challenge to Critics and Scientologists Alike

11 December 1997:
Re: Scientology/IRS Connection


RELATED FILES:

Public Research Foundation Press Release: "HIDDEN TIES BETWEEN IRS AND SCIENTOLOGY REVEALED"

The CST LEGAL PAPERS series


PUBLIC NOTICE:
The files on this site were found in publically available usenet archives and are in the public domain.

10 APRIL 2000:
Part 7, 1979-1980 FIX AND REPOST

This is the seventh in an eight-part timeline posted by The Librarian covering the decade of 1972-1982. If you haven't yet, you should read The Librarian's post introducing the timeline and Part 1, etc.

Date: 10 Apr 2000 04:52:39 -0000
From: Anonymous-Remailer@See.Comment.Header (The Librarian)
Subject: Part 7, 1979-1980 FIX AND REPOST
Newsgroups: alt.religion.scientology
Message-ID: <1956E7795B@127.0.0.1>

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

DATE CONVENTIONS IN THE TIME LINE

It has been impossible to get exact dates for some of the events
listed herein. If the event seemed important enough to include, yet no
exact day--or, in some cases, no month--was given, the indication "c."
(for circa) has been put AFTER the information (day or month) in
question.
    As an example, an event known to have occurred in June of 1974, but
without certainty as to the actual day, might be listed as "Saturday, 1
c. June 1974." If only a month and year are known (as in the example
just given), and there is no indication of, e.g., "late June," then the
event has usually been assigned arbitrarily to the 1st or the 15th of
the indicated month, unless surrounding events indicate a different,
more likely day of the month. The weekday names (e.g. Monday, Tuesday,
etc.) have been included as additional data.
    If the only indication of the time of the event was "mid-1974,"
then the entry might read "Saturday, 1 c. June c. 1974, indicating that
the month, too, is estimated from the language of the referenced source.
Only rarely have incidents been included where the only information
available is a givien year. When it seemed important enough to include
in the Time Line, it was put, usually, at 1 c. January c. of the given
year, or at 1 c. July c. of the given year, whichever seemed most
likely--mainly as a "bookmark" for the event, pending more exact dating.
Every effort has been made to isolate, as closely as possible, the
exact date for each event. If anyone has any more accurate information
about any event described herein, please post it to the newsgroup,
"alt.religion.scientology."

======================
1979-1980
======================

Monday, 05 February 1979
The Associated Press, February 5, 1979, AM cycle, DATELINE: WASHINGTON:
    "A second judge has removed himself from presiding over the pending
trial of 11 members of the church of Scientology accused of stealing
government documents and planting bugging devices in government offices.
    "Federal District Judge Louis Oberdorfer decided monday he would
not preside over the case because of a possible conflict ofinterest.
Government lawyers pointed out that Oberdorfer [headed?] the tax
division in the Justice Department at a time when the division was
investigation the tax-exempt status of the church.
    "Last month, Judge George L. Hart jr. stepped down after the
defendants noted that government documents accused them of conducting
illegal surveillance against Hart...."
SOURCE: Associated Press, 5 February 1979

Thursday, 01 c. March 1979
LRH moves into an apartment in Hemet, California, after having allegedly
"hidden out" for some unspecified amount of time in a motel in the San
Jacinto mountains, due to a former staff member, Ed Walters, having gone
to the FBI with LRH's whereabouts. His only companions in the mountains
and on moving to Hemet are allegedly Mike and Kima Douglas.
SOURCE: Bare Faced Messiah, Chapter 21

Thursday, 01 c. March 1979
LRH, along with three other leaders of Scientology--including Georges
Andreu, former head of the movement's French branch--are convicted in
absentia of fraud in Paris, are levied fines, and given suspended
sentences. [NOTE: Date is reckoned from the date of the appeal ruling in
the case of Andreu; see entry for 29 February 1980, which says the
convictions took place "a year ago."BUT, see also 8 January 1976, as the
actual appeal court ruling claims (in what appears to be a fair-to-poor
French-to-English translation) that to be the date of the actual
conviction. See OUTPOINTS, below.]
OUTPOINTS: CONTRARY FACTS: The newspaper account says one thing--putting
the conviction at around this date--but the actual appeal ruling, if it
can be understood, says Andreu (and LRH, et. al) was convicted on 8
January 1976. There seems to be a good deal of confusion surrounding
this entire event.
SOURCE: "Files of the FBI," #311 posted on the internet; from
INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, Published with The New York Times and the
Washington Post, PARIS, MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1980

Sunday, 15 c. April 1979
Gerald Armstrong is purportedly on the RPF, working on renovations of a
house that is "to be the dwelling of L. Ron Hubbard."
SOURCE: "BRAINWASHING iN SCIENTOLOGY'S REHABILITATION PROJECT FORCE
(RPF)"-- Revised Version of a Presentation at the Society for the
Scientific Study of Religion, San Diego, California (November 7, 1977).
by Dr Stephen Kent [University of Alberta, Canada]

Thursday, 26 April 1979
The Associated Press, April 26, 1979, Thursday, AM cycle, DATELINE:
WASHINGTON:
    "A federal judge set a Sept. 24 trial date Wednesday for nine
members of the Church of Scientology who are charged with stealing
government documents.
    "U.S. District Judge Charles R. Richey also set aside two weeks in
July beginning July 2 to dispose of all pretrial matters in the
complicated case.
    "...The church contends the government has been waging a campaign
of harassment against the Scientologists for nearly 30 years. The church
has admitted copying government documents but said it did so only after
trying unsuccessfully to obtain the information through the Freedom of
Information Act."
SOURCE: Associated Press, 26 April 1979

Sunday, 15 c. July 1979
La Venda Van Schaick, approaches attorney Michael Flynn for the purpose
of obtaining a refund of monies paid by her to the Church of Scientology
in the amount of approximately $12,800. Flynn sends a letter to the
church for the purpose of obtaining the money and thus saving the
trouble of a lawsuit. They refuse to pay.
SOURCE: A text file: "corydon.txt," a version of Bent Corydon's book,
"Messiah or Madman," as found on the Internet

Friday, 20 July 1979
Charles F.C. Ruff is in the running to be the new U.S. attorney for the
District of Columbia.
SOURCE: The Washington Post The Washington Post, July 20, 1979, Friday,
Final Edition, "Civiletti: Pledge to Keep Justice Independent," by
Charles R. Babcock, Washington Post Staff Writer

Sunday, 22 July 1979
The Associated Press, August 22, 1979, Wednesday, AM cycle, by JEFFREY
MILLS, Associated Press Writer, DATELINE: WASHINGTON:
    "A potent substance that can produce four days of delirium is
legally obtainable, an arm of the Church of Scientology said Wednesday.
Vaughn Young, research director for the church's American Citizens for
Honesty in Government, said he obtained a vial of the substance, known
as BZ, by telling a pharmaceutical company that he was a doctor working
at a research lab.
    "Robert Feldcamp of the Drug Enforcement Administration confirmed
that BZ is not on the list of controlled substances, which his agency
enforces.
    "...The American Citizens for Honesty in Government is trying to
locate Army veterans who were given BZ in the Edgewood Arsenel tests.
The group, which says the government should do follow-up studies on the
effects of the drug, has offered free medical exams to veterans who
suspect they were given BZ."
SOURCE: Associated Press, 22 August 1979

Wednesday, 25 c. July 1979
LRH,, allegedly in Hemet, California, allegedly orders an infiltration
of Michael Flynn's law office by G.O. agent Chuck Malone, who seeks
employment from Flynn posing as a private investigator. His purpose is
purportedly to steal records and information. He is not hired."
SOURCE: A text file: "corydon.txt," a version of Bent Corydon's book,
"Messiah or Madman," as found on the Internet

Wednesday, 01 c. August 1979
Mary Sue Hubbard sees LRH for the last time. NOTE: Based on her
testimony in the Armstrong trial, as reported by UPI in a story
regarding incidents of 7 May 1984 [see].
SOURCE: UPI story of 8 May 1984, on file

Friday, 24 August 1979
The Associated Press August 24, 1979, Friday, AM cycle, by MARTIN
CRUTSINGER, Associated Press Writer, DATELINE: WASHINGTON
    "A federal judge ruled Friday that the federal goverment had
'illegally and unconstitutionally' seized documents during a raid on the
Church of Scientology here in 1977.
    "U.S. District Judge William J. Bryant ordered the government to
return all of the documents seized by 25 FBI agents during their July 8,
1977, search.
    "Assistant U.S. Attorney Raymond Banoun said the government would
appeal Bryant's decision.
    "Banoun said the ruling would have no effect on an upcoming
criminal trial of nine church members accused of stealing government
documents and planting bugging devices in government offices.
"Banoun said none of the documents seized in the Washington raid
were to have been used in the criminal trial. He said the criminal
charges were based on evidence seized during a raid the same day at
church facilities in Los Angeles.
    "U.S. District Judge Malcolm M. Lucas in Los Angeles ruled last
year that the West Coast search was legal. That decision was later
upheld by a federal appeals court.
    "The church has contended that both raids were a part of a
harrassment program by the government because the church is attempting
to uncover alleged government misconduct. ..."
SOURCE: Associated Press, 24 August 1979

Saturday, 01 c. September c. 1979
Mike and Kima Douglas blow.
SOURCE: Bare Faced Messiah, Chapter 21

Saturday, 06 October 1979
"Stipulation of Evidence" in the Scientology 11 trial is signed by Mary
Sue Hubbard and eight other Guardian's Office executives and their
attorneys.
SOURCE: U. S. District Court, Central District Of California; Church Of
Scientology International, Plaintiffs; Steven Fishman And Uwe Geertz,
Defendants. Case No. Cv 91 6426 Hlh (tx); Declaration Of Robert Vaughn
Young; Date: April 4, 1994

Monday, 08 October 1979
"In an unusual legal manoeuvre, an agreement was reached that the nine
defendants would plead guilty to one count each if the government
presented a written statement of its case, thereby avoiding a lengthy
trial."
OUTPOINTS: CONTRARY FACTS: Date does not agree with the 6 October entry
from Vaughn Young.
SOURCE: Bare Faced Messiah, Chapter 21

Monday, 08 October 1979
"Thereafter, on October 8, 1979, Judge Richey, over the government's
objection, granted appellants' motion to require the government to
comply with a Disposition Agreement to which appellants contended the
government had agreed.(FN4) Under this Agreement, each appellant was to
be found guilty by the court on one specified count on the basis of the
'Stipulation of Evidence.' Upon consideration of this uncontested
evidence and in accordance with the Disposition Agreement, the court
found appellants guilty as follows: Hubbard, Heldt, Snider, Willardson,
Weigand and Wolfe, of conspiracy to obstruct justice and other offenses
(Count 23); Hermann, of conspiracy to burglarize government offices and
steal documents (Count 1); and Thomas, of misdemeanor theft of
government property (Count 17)."
OUTPOINTS: ADDED INAPPLICABLE OBJECTION: The government had set up the
agreement, then "objected." Sure. There is little question that the
"objection" had been prearranged to be overruled, so it could be on the
record to LOOK like the government actually wanted a trial--for which
there isn't a chance in hell.
SOURCE: Nos. 79-2442, 79-2447 to 79-2450, 79-2456, 79-2459 and 79-2462.
United States Court of Appeals, District of Columbia Circuit. 668 F.2d
1238 215 U.S.App.D.C. 206 Argued Feb. 27, 1981. Decided Oct. 2, 1981. As
Amended Oct. 2 and 30, 1981.

Monday, 08 October 1979
The Associated Press, October 8, 1979, Monday, AM cycle, by LARRY
MARGASAK, Associated Press Writer, DATELINE: WASHINGTON
    "A federal judge approved an unusual agreement Monday under which
nine leaders of the Church of Scientology will be found guilty of
plotting to steal government documents about the church.
"But Assistant U.S. Attorney Raymond Banoun, chief prosecutor in
the case, said the government would appeal the judge's decision.
    "U.S. District Judge Charles R. Richey ruled that the government
can present its case against the Scientologists through a written court
record without holding a trial.
    "Richey said he would then rule, on the basis of the written
record, that each defendant is guilty of one count in a 28-count
indictment.
    "The judge's ruling stemmed from plea bargaining between the
prosecutors and defense attorneys that has been underway for several
weeks.
    "The Scientologists had insisted that the government backed out of
the agreement for the so-called 'stipulated record' while the government
claimed there never was such an agreement.
    "Richey's ruling Monday said that a verbal agreement was made on
Sept. 23 and ordered that it be put into effect.
    "The Scientologists had asked for the stipulated record so they
could retain their right of appeal, a right they would lose if they
simply pleaded guilty.
    "...Under the agreement Richey put into effect:
    "Seven defendants will be found guilty of conspiracy to obstruct
justice, which carries a maximum penalty of five years in prison and a
$10,000 fine. The defendants are Mary Sue Hubbard, wife of the church's
founder, L. Ron Hubbard, Henning Heldt, Duke Snider, Richard Weigand,
Gregory Willardson, Cindy Raymond and Gerald Bennett Wolfe.
    "Defendant Mitchell Hermann will be found guilty of conspiracy to
illegally obtain government documents, which also carries a maximum
five-year jail term and $10,000 fine.
    "Defendant Sharon Thomas, who the government says worked in the
Justice Department as part of the conspiracy, will be found guilty of an
as-yet unspecified misdemeanor theft count.
    "Richey also said the government has the right to release to the
public all the documents that it would have used in a jury trial against
the Scientologists. These documents are among the thousands seized
during a raid of the Scientologists' Los Angeles office on July 8, 1977."
SOURCE: The Associated Press, October 8, 1979

Tuesday, 16 October 1979
Charles F.C. Ruff is nominated to be U.S. attorney for the District of
Columbia [NOTE: Ruff was a Watergate special prosecutor, now goes on to
oversee the case against Mary Sue Hubbard, et. al, and later defends
Bill Clinton in impeachment proceedings.--Ed.]
SOURCE: The Washington Post, October 16, 1979

Friday, 19 October 1979
"On about October 19, 1979, he [Michael Flynn] was flying this plane to
South Bend, Indiana, when the engine began to malfunction at
approximately 8,000 feet and lost power entirely for a period of some
time, and he was forced to land at an airport nearby. He claims that he
subsequently discovered large amounts of water in the fuel tanks,
'although prior to take-off I had gone through the normal pre-flight
examination without discovering any water.' Flynn believes that water
balloons, which are designed to dissolve about an hour after takeoff,
were placed in the tanks by G.O. agents, on the express orders of
Hubbard."
SOURCE: A text file: "corydon.txt," a version of Bent Corydon's book,
"Messiah or Madman," as found on the Internet

Thursday, 25 October 1979
The Associated Press, October 25, 1979, Thursday, AM cycle, by LARRY
MARGASKA, Associated Press Writer, DATELINE: WASHINGTON:
    "Documents made public Thursday show that the Church of
Scientology planted spies at the Justice Department and the Internal
Revenue Service and bugged an IRS meeting where the church's tax
exemption was under discussion.
    "Federal prosecutors made these disclosures in a 10-inch-high stack
of documents that were ordered released by U.S. District Judge Charles
R. Richey. Richey is to hand down a verdict Friday in the case of nine
leaders of the church who are charged with conspiracy and theft of
government documents.
    "...Richey, who is not obligated to convict the defendants, will
announce his decision in the case Friday, barring any last-minute hitch.
Since the defendants will not technically be pleading guilty, [emphasis
added] they may appeal any conviction to the U.S. Court of Appeals. ..."
SOURCE: The Associated Press, October 25, 1979

Friday, 26 October 1979
The Associated Press, October 26, 1979, Friday, PM cycle, by LARRY
MARGASAK, Associated Press Writer, DATELINE: WASHINGTON:
    "A federal judge today found nine members of the Church of
Scientology guilty of conspiracy or stealing government documents about
the church.
    "U.S. District Judge Charles R. Richey found each defendant guilty
of one count of the 28-count indictment.
    "The judge told the defendants and their attorneys, who stood in a
semicircle facing the bench, that he found "'he evidence establishes
each and every element set forth (in the indictment) without a
reasonable doubt.'
    "No sentencing date was set.
    "Defense attorneys had agreed not to appeal the evidence laid out
by the government in a 284-page written record that substituted for a
jury trial.
    "But the defense lawyers said they hoped to overturn the guilty
verdicts by challenging the legality of a search of Scientology offices
in Los Angeles which resulted in seizure of thousands of church
documents supporting the government's case.
    "Acting U.S. Attorney Carl S. Rauh said in a statement after the
verdicts: 'The convictions today conclusively establish that a multitude
of serious crimes were committed against the United States over a
four-year period by numerous high officials of the Church of
Scientology.' ..."
SOURCE: The Associated Press, October 26, 1979

Saturday, 03 November 1979
The Clearwater Sun, Saturday, 3-Nov-79, "Judge rules papers available to
public," by Richard Leiby, Sun Staff Writer:
    "WASHINGTON - Documents revealing a Scientology espionage campaign
against government agencies ranging from the IRS to the Clearwater City
Commission were declared open to further public inspection Friday
afternoon by a federal judge.
    "Scientology attorneys had argued strenuously that the papers
should be sealed because they would "irreparable injury" to the church.
    "The public availability of the dozen cartons of government-seized
documents - the basis of last week's conspiracy convication of nine top
chruch officials - was in doubt until U.S. District Judge Charles R.
Richey issued his ruling.
    "Scientologists sought to reclaim the papers, or at least block
their release to the media on grounds they no longer were crucial to the
government's case.
    "But Richey, who personally reviewed the material, ruled the
Scientologists' argument invalid.
    "The papers [are] among more than 40 cartons of evidence seized
during an FBI raid at the cult's Losa Angeles headquarters in July
1978... ."
    "Richey also rejected the Scientologist's compromise request that
if the documents were not returned, they at least should be kept sealed.
    "...Scientologists asked for the restraining order Thursday night
after Richey released documents showing the sect kept dossiers and ran
'rumour campaigns' against public officials and private medical groups
around the nation.
    "Richey also denied a last-minute appeal attempt after Friday's
hearing but court officials said Scientologists will get another chance
to stay Richey's order in the U.S. Court of Appeal next week.
    "Richey apparently will continue making documents available on
Monday. He has been reviewing the papers privately since the conviction
of the cult leaders and issuing those he feels are not damaging to
innocent parties."
SOURCE: The Clearwater Sun, Saturday, 3-Nov-79

Friday, 23 November 1979
The appellate court orders the seal to be lifted and begins releasing
the documents from the FBI raids.
SOURCE: Bare Faced Messiah, Chapter 21

Sunday, 25 c. November 1979
Michael Flynn sends an employee to the Federal Court in Washington to
copy thousands of the documents released from the FBI raids.
SOURCE: A text file: "corydon.txt," a version of Bent Corydon's book,
"Messiah or Madman," as found on the Internet

Saturday, 01 c. December 1979
Ron announces formation of a new Executive Strata, "[p]ositioned above
existing Flag Management orgs." Also mentions that "The Guardian Office
has achieved the support of two new management committees: the
Controller Committee and the Guardian Committee formed to assist the
Controller and Guardian."
SOURCE: LRH ED 307 INT

Tuesday, 04 December 1979
The Washington Post, December 4, 1979, Tuesday, Final Edition, "Harsh
Penalties Urged In Scientology Case," by Laura A. Kiernan, Washington
Post Staff Writer:
    "Federal prosecutors yesterday urged a U.S. District judge to
impose maximum criminal penalties on members of the Church of
Scientology for their roles in a massive conspiracy to infiltrate and
burglarize government offices.
    "In a 70-page, harshly worded memorandum, the prosecutors contend
that the defendants 'brazen and persistent' acts against the government
were only a 'mirror aspect' of wider activities that included smear
campaigns, spying and theft directed at public and private individuals
critical of the church.
    "'No building, office desk, or file was safe from their snooping
and prying. No individual or organization was free from their despicable
conspiratorial minds,' the government said in the memorandum filed with
the court. ..." [NOTE: Although it is not mentioned in any media
account, the memorandum being quoted from was signed not only by the
federal prosecutors that have been working the case, but also by Charles
F. C. Ruff.--Ed.]
SOURCE: The Washington Post, December 4, 1979,

Thursday, 06 December 1979
"Judge Richey declined to continue the sentencing of appellants pending
his ruling on the motion, and appellants were sentenced on December 6
and 7.(FN5) The recusal motion was subsequently denied in a memorandum
and order filed on December 14, 1979 (J.A. at 387-93). These appeals
followed.
    "FN5. All appellants except Thomas were sentenced pursuant to 18
U.S.C. s 4205. Appellant HUBBARD was sentenced on Count 23 to a
five-year term of imprisonment and fined $10,000. Appellants Heldt,
Snider, Willardson, and Weigand were each sentenced on Count 23 to four
year terms of imprisonment and each fined $10,000. Appellant Hermann was
sentenced to a four year term of imprisonment on Count 1 and fined
$10,000. Appellants Raymond and Wolfe were each sentenced on Count 23 to
a five year term of imprisonment and each was fined $10,000. Appellant
Thomas was sentenced on Count 17 to a fine of $1,000 and a one year term
of imprisonment; six months of that sentence were suspended and she was
placed on probation for five years."
SOURCE: Nos. 79-2442, 79-2447 to 79-2450, 79-2456, 79-2459 and 79-2462.
United States Court of Appeals, District of Columbia Circuit. 668 F.2d
1238 215 U.S.App.D.C. 206 Argued Feb. 27, 1981. Decided Oct. 2, 1981. As
Amended Oct. 2 and 30, 1981.

Thursday, 06 December 1979
The Associated Press, December 6, 1979, Thursday, PM cycle, by LARRY
MARGASAK, Associated Press Writer, DATELINE: WASHINGTON:
    "A federal judge today sentenced Mary Sue Hubbard, wife of the
founder of the Church of Scientology, to a maximum five-year prison term
for conspiring to steal government documents about the church.
    "After announcing the sentence, U.S. District Judge Charles R.
Richey held out the possibility that the sentence could be reduced at a
later date. He ordered prison officials to interview Mrs. Hubbard and
report back to him in three months on whether the full sentence should
be served.
    "Richey, who also fined Mrs. Hubbard the maximum $10,000, directed
her to report to prison in 10 days.
    "Within that period, Richey said, her lawyers can ask the U.S.
Court of Appeals to postpone her sentence until the appeal of her
conviction is heard.
    "After Mrs. Hubbard's sentencing, Richey called a brief recess
before imposing sentences on eight other church officials convicted of
participating in the plot to steal government documents.
    "Seven of Mrs. Hubbard's co-defendants also were convicted of
conspiracy. The other, convicted of theft, faced a maximum one year in
jail and a $1,000 fine.
    "...Convicted on a single conspiracy count each were: Mrs. Hubbard,
Henning Heldt, Duke Snider, Gregory Willardson, Richard Weigand,
Mitchell Hermann, Cindy Raymond and Gerald Bennett Wolfe.
    "Sharon Thomas was convicted on a misdemeanor theft count."
SOURCE: The Associated Press, December 6, 1979

Friday, 07 December 1979
"Judge Richey declined to continue the sentencing of appellants pending
his ruling on the motion, and appellants were sentenced on December 6
and 7.(FN5) The recusal motion was subsequently denied in a memorandum
and order filed on December 14, 1979 (J.A. at 387-93). These appeals
followed.(FN6)
    "FN5. All appellants except Thomas were sentenced pursuant to 18
U.S.C. s 4205. Appellant HUBBARD was sentenced on Count 23 to a
five-year term of imprisonment and fined $10,000. Appellants Heldt,
Snider, Willardson, and Weigand were each sentenced on Count 23 to four
year terms of imprisonment and each fined $10,000. Appellant Hermann was
sentenced to a four year term of imprisonment on Count 1 and fined
$10,000. Appellants Raymond and Wolfe were each sentenced on Count 23 to
a five year term of imprisonment and each was fined $10,000. Appellant
Thomas was sentenced on Count 17 to a fine of $1,000 and a one year term
of imprisonment; six months of that sentence were suspended and she was
placed on probation for five years."
SOURCE: Nos. 79-2442, 79-2447 to 79-2450, 79-2456, 79-2459 and 79-2462.
United States Court of Appeals, District of Columbia Circuit. 668 F.2d
1238 215 U.S.App.D.C. 206 Argued Feb. 27, 1981. Decided Oct. 2, 1981. As
Amended Oct. 2 and 30, 1981.

Thursday, 13 December 1979
La Venda Van Schaick files her complaint against CSC, CS Nevada, CS
Florida, FCDC, LRH, Mary Sue Hubbard, and numerous other individuals as
officials of the various churches. (Her complaint is later amended
twice)
SOURCE: Data gotten from ruling of March 26, 1982 in the case, La Venda
VAN SCHAICK, Plaintiff, v. CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY OF CALIFORNIA, INC., et
al., Defendants; Civ. A. No. 79-2491-G; United States District Court, D.
Massachusetts.

Thursday, 13 December 1979
The Associated Press, December 13, 1979, Thursday, AM cycle, "Woman Sues
Scientologists for $200 Million over 'Mind Control,'" by THOMAS S.
BROWN, Associated Press Writer, DATELINE: BOSTON:
    "A 29-year-old former member of the Church of Scientology filed a
$200 million lawsuit Thursday against the church, charging that the
group has cheated thousands of converts by subjecting them to 'mind
control.'
    "Lavenda Van Schaick of Somerville contended in the suit filed in
U.S. District Court here that the church misled her into divorcing her
husband, paying about $13,000 for Scientologist instruction and working
for the church without pay for nine years in Clearwater, Fla., and Las
Vegas, Nev.
    "The lawsuit also asks that 17 persons, including church founder L.
Ron Hubbard, be removed from power and the that church be placed in the
hands of a federal receiver. ..."
SOURCE: The Associated Press, December 13, 1979

Saturday, 15 December 1979
LRH signs a will at Los Angeles. Also on this date, he creates the L.
RON HUBBARD INTER VIVOS TRUST, referenced in the will. The will
describes an "irrevocable trust" of which Norton S. Karno is named
Trustee, but this seems to be separate from the inter vivos trust, of
which LRH is trustee (?). The will is witnessed by Pat Broecker, Anne
Broecker, and Diana Voegeding.
SOURCE: Copy of the will

Tuesday, 01 c. January 1980
"In January of 1980 there was an announcement of a possible raid to be
made by the FBI or other law enforcement agencies of (Gilman Hot
Springs). Everyone...was required by...the Commodore's Messengers to go
through all documents located on the property and 'vet' or destroy
anything which showed that Hubbard controlled Scientology organizations,
retained financial control, or was issuing orders to people at Gilman
Hot Springs."
SOURCE: Gerald Armstrong's "Appendix" for an unknown court case

Tuesday, 01 c. January 1980
Laurel Sullivan is LRH's Personal Public Relations Officer. She is
Gerald Armstrong's senior. She is working on MCCS (Mission Corporate
Category Sort-out)
SOURCE: Gerald Armstrong's "Appendix" for an unknown court case

Tuesday, 01 c. January 1980
Gerald Armstrong says: "I...worked in Los Angeles for the first few
months of 1980 on Mission Corporate Category Sortout ("MCCS"), which had
the purpose of restructuring the Scientology enterprise..."
SOURCE: Declaration of Gerald Armstrong, filed in the United States
District Court for the Northern District of California, in RTC v. Grady
Ward, No. C-96-20207 RMW; RTC v. Keith Henson, No. C-96-20271 RMW; and
RTC v. Dennis Erlich, et. al, No. C-95-20091 RMW

Saturday, 05 c. January 1980
Quoted from Gerald Armstrong:
    "They had rented the shredder and we had 200 people and the entire
property of Gilman Hot Springs dedicated to this shredding.
    "They had this paper shredder which was so big! This thing took
them through like in quarter-inch swaths! Wwwwwwwww r r r r r r
rrrrthhhhhhhhhhh~
    "It was a big big big, giant munching shredder!
    "Laurel Sullivan says they called it "Jaws," but I think they also
called it 'Igor.'
    "This was a bigger cover-up incident than anything that had ever
happened before.
    "At the previous major shredding operation at La Quinta, we were
ordered to shred anything which connected Hubbard to the G.O.
    "At Gilman each person went through his stuff that he had been
assigned. There were people who did nothing else but shred, called
'Shredder Operators.'
    "This time the criteria had been expanded:
    "a. Any evidence of Hubbard's control of Scientology. b. Any
document that showed that he had ordered anything at all. c. Any
document that showed that he was intending to reside at the Gilman Hot
Springs property. d. Anything that showed that he had ever been to the
Gilman Hot Springs property.
    "Each person had to go though any documents in his area.
    "I was in charge at that time of the household unit at Gilman. In
the household unit, we were setting up a house for Hubbard.
    "We tiled the floor. His bedroom tiles were dark blue and the room
itself was painted dark blue. This was because he had some theory about
sleeping in dark rooms and how much better he slept... .
    "Anyway, late one night I came across a box of stuff. And it was
about eight inches deep, maybe 12 inches wide and 16 inches long. It was
all beat up, opened, you could see that the lid had all kinds of tears.
Brenda Black had found it and she handed it over to me.
    "I looked through it. And I knew right away that this was a whole
different thing than I'd ever seen in Scientology. These papers were out
of a whole different realm.
    "A real letter written by Hubbard? You've got to understand I knew
all about Standing Order Number 1; that S.O. 1* was a lie.
    "These letters I was now witnessing were mainly the ones between
him and his first wife.
    "There were also two diaries, which he had kept from [his days in]
Asia. And then there were all sorts of other assorted papers going all
the way back, some into the 19th century.
    "Brenda wanted to know what to do. And I remember my Scientological
mind going back and forth on whether or not to keep these documents. Did
it make sense? I had to evaluate, because the whole place was mustered
into destroying documents.
    "We found several boxes, and Hubbard's biography had suddenly
become possible, because now we had some material. All we had before
were these things written by Hubbard, and a few old science fiction
magazines. Now all ofa sudden we had letters, we had diaries, and so on.
All there was known prior to that, even by the top PRs, was the pub~lic
picture that had been manufactured by Hubbard.
    "I wrote Hubbard a despatch proposing the biography idea.
    "He answered that with a couple of paragraphs. I did not have any
idea of the extent of the materials I had stumbled onto. Neither, it
turned out, did he.
    "I did a little bit of reading of the documents. Then I started to
assemble it into some kind of sense. It was real difficult, given the
time and distractions."
SOURCE: Gerald Armstrong as quoted in a text file: "corydon.txt," a
version of Bent Corydon's book, "Messiah or Madman," as found on the
Internet

Tuesday, 08 January 1980
Quote from Gerald Armstrong legal document: "On January 8, 1980,
Defendant Armstrong wrote a petition to Hubbard requesting his
permission to perform the research for a biography to be done about his
life... . Hubbard approved the petition, and Defendant Armstrong became
the L. Ron Hubbard Personal Relations Officer Researcher (PPRO Res)."
SOURCE: Gerald Armstrong's "Appendix" for an unknown court case

Friday, 01 c. February 1980
Quoted from Gerald Armstrong: "It was also during this early part of
1980 that Hubbard left the location in Gilman Hot Springs, California,
and went into hiding. Although Defendant Armstrong was advised by Laurel
Sullivan that no one could communicate with Hubbard, Defendant Armstrong
knew that the ability for communication existed, because he had
forwarded materials to Hubbard at his request in mid-1980."
SOURCE: Gerald Armstrong's "Appendix" for an unknown court case

Friday, 01 c. February 1980
Quoted from Gerald Armstrong legal document: "During the first part of
1980, Defendant Armstrong moved all of the L. Ron Hubbard Archives
materials he had located at Gilman Hot Springs to an office in
the...Cedars Complex in Los Angeles.... (He) located himself in the
Cedars Complex, because he was also involved in "Mission Corporate
Category Sort-Out," a mission to work out legal strategy. Defendant
Armstrong was involved with this mission until June of 1990 (sic--see
Outpoints)."
OUTPOINTS: CONTRARY FACTS, DROPPED OUT TIME: The date "June of 1990" has
to be incorrect. It is most likely meant to be "June of 1980," and that
assumption is being made for a new entry (see June, 1980)
SOURCE: Gerald Armstrong's "Appendix" for an unknown court case

Friday, 01 c. February 1980
Quoted from Gerald Armstrong legal document: "Because of (the) purported
inability to communicate with Hubbard, Defendant Armstrong's request to
purchase biographical materials of Hubbard from people who offered them
for sale went to the Commodore's Messenger Organization, the personal
representatives of Hubbard."
SOURCE: Gerald Armstrong's "Appendix" for an unknown court case

Friday, 01 c. February 1980
Quoted from Gerald Armstrong:
    "In the beginning of February the messengers moved to the [Cedars]
Complex, two and a half hours away in Los Angeles, where they were now
'The Messengers!'
    "They just descended on the place and had this impact on the joint.
    "There was DM (David Miscavage) and the WDC (Watch Dog Committee).
    "Laurel [Sullivan] and I [Gerald Armstrong] moved to L.A. also, and
with us went the LRH archives.
    "In L.A. there are collectors and early Dianeticists, and other
people that knew Hubbard, so some research could be done there."
SOURCE: Gerald Armstrong as quoted in a text file: "corydon.txt," a
version of Bent Corydon's book, "Messiah or Madman," as found on the
Internet

Tuesday, 05 February 1980
Quoted from Gerald Armstrong legal document: "Following his approval by
Hubbard as biography researcher, Defendant Armstrong wrote to [Mary Sue
Hubbard] on February 5, 1980, advising her of the scope of the project.
In the letter Defendant stated that he had found documents which
included Hubbard's diary from his Orient trip, poems, essays from his
youth, and several personal letters, as well as other things."
SOURCE: Gerald Armstrong's "Appendix" for an unknown court case

Sunday, 10 c. February 1980
Quoted from Gerald Armstrong: "I [Gerald Armstrong] got in touch with
collector Virgil Wilhite and we paid him $65,000.00 for his collection
of LRH memorabilia, early books and other writings that the organization
didn't have."
SOURCE: Gerald Armstrong as quoted in a text file: "corydon.txt," a
version of Bent Corydon's book, "Messiah or Madman," as found on the
Internet

Monday, 11 February 1980
Quoted from Gerald Armstrong legal document: "By letter of February 11,
1980, [Mary Sue Hubbard] responded to Defendant, acknowledging that he
would be carrying out the duties of Biography Researcher."
SOURCE: Gerald Armstrong's "Appendix" for an unknown court case

Tuesday, 19 February 1980
In a Stipulation filed in United States Tax Court, N. Jerold Cohen,
Chief Counsel, Internal Revenue Service, says: "1. Scientology is and at
all relevant times was a religion within the purview of the First
Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. 2. Petitioners'
Articles of Organization satisfied the 'organizational test' prescribed
by Treas. Reg. Û1.501 (c)(3)-1 (b)..." (NOTE: This is a case regarding
the years 1970, 1971 and 1972.)
SOURCE: Booklet, "Fact vs Fiction; A Correction of Falsehoods Contained
in the May 6, 1991 Issue of l Magazine," published by the Church of
Scientology International, page 18

Monday, 25 c. February 1980
Quoted from referenced source: "At the end of February 1980, a few days
before his sixty-ninth birthday, Hubbard disappeared with Annie and Pat
Broeker. He was never seen again."
SOURCE: Bare Faced Messiah, Chapter 21

Friday, 29 February 1980
The Paris Court of Appeal recognizes the U.S.-based Church of
Scientology as a religion, and clears Georges Andreu--former head of the
movement's French branch--of charges of fraud. Andreu and "three other
leaders," including LRH, had received "fines and suspended prison
sentences a year ago" after the movement was accused of enticing people
to join by making fraudulent promises. Andreu is the only one of the
four to appeal. The appeals court acquits him because of what judges
call his evident good faith. The court's president indicates that the
three others, who were sentenced in their absence, might be acquitted if
they appealed.
SOURCE: "Files of the FBI," #311 posted on the internet; from
INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, Published with The New York Times and the
Washington Post, PARIS, MONDAY, MARCH 3, 1980

Saturday, 26 April 1980
The Associated Press, April 26, 1980, DATELINE: TAMPA, Fla.
    "A woman is seeking more than $3 million in a suit against the
Church of Scientology contending she was brainwashed and forced to work
as a 'personal slave,' tending the whims and eccentricities of founder L
Ron Hubbard.
    "Tonja C. Burden, 20, of Las Vegas, Nev., filed suit in U.S.
District Court here Friday. She alleged she was brainwashed, forced to
work as a laundress or scullery maid for as long as 72 hours at a time
without sleep, kept behind locked doors for lie detector rehabilitation
sessions and ordered to sever ties with her parents.
    "The suit said she escaped from Scientology headquarters in
Clearwater in November 1977... ."
SOURCE: The Associated Press, April 26, 1980

Sunday, 01 c. June 1980
Quoted from Gerald Armstrong legal document: "In June of 1980 Defendant
Armstrong became involved in the selection of a writer for the Hubbard
biography. Defendant Armstrong learned that Hubbard had approved of a
biography proposal prepared by Omar Garrison, a writer who was not a
member of Scientology."
SOURCE: Gerald Armstrong's "Appendix" for an unknown court case

Sunday, 01 c. June 1980
Gerald Armstrong's involvement in Mission Corporate Category Sort-out
(MCCS) ends. (This date is reckoned from an earlier entry which
inaccurately dates this in 1990.)
SOURCE: Gerald Armstrong's "Appendix" for an unknown court case

Wednesday, 25 June 1980
Church of Scientology of the United Kingdom is incorporated on 25 June
1980 by Peter Morgan, Alistair Gray and Judith Grey. Its corporate
address is given as 68 Tottenham Court Road (the London org) and its
purpose is given as being the use of the chapel at Saint Hill Manor for
"worship of the Supreme Being."
OUTPOINTS: VARIOUS: (NOTE: These are quoted comments from the source of
this information, a poster to a.r.s.): "It is not recorded as having had
any capital, assets, income or business dealings. In 1985 it was
declared dormant (there's a legal definition of this, apparently). In
1988, 1989 and 1990 it declared that it did not have to have its
accounts audited - this is apparently legal in the case of a dormant
company. In 1991, the last AGM voted that no further AGMs would be
held, nor further accounts or returns submitted. The entity was finally
struck off the register of companies on 25 July 1995 - there are no
records of any requests for this, so I assume it was done by Companies
House after COS of UK failed to produce any more returns. There's no
trace of any accounts between 1980 (incorporation) and 1985 (the
beginning of dormancy), which is very odd. COS of UK appears to have
owned nothing, received nothing and sold nothing. What was it for? My
guess is that it was an abortive attempt to create a UK-based entity for
Scientology, along the lines of COS (E&W). The dates of its
incorporation and dissolution are perhaps significant. It was
incorporated shortly after the repeal of the 1968-80 ban on foreign
Scientologists entering the UK and was dissolved almost exactly a year
before the incorporation of COS (E&W)"
SOURCE: A posted message to a.r.s from Chris Owen (?) who had done
research at the Companies House registry in London.

Monday, 28 July 1980
Wollersheim files his original action against the Church.
SOURCE: From a ruling in the following case: Cite as: 42 Cal.App.4th
628, 49 Cal.Rptr.2d 620; CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY OF CALIFORNIA, Plaintiff
and Appellant, v. LAWRENCE WOLLERSHEIM, Defendant and Respondent. Nos.
B084686; B086063 California Court of Appeals, Second District, Division
Three Superior Court No. BC074815. Found on the web at:
http://www.sirius.com/~casp/wollers1.html

Monday, 28 July 1980
WOLLERSHEIM I: Wollersheim vs. CSC (1989) 212 Cal.App.3d 872: Complaint
filed 7-28-80; Attorney Earle Cooley represented CSC.
SOURCE: A chronology of Wollersheim cases "Filed by Robert F. Donohue,
of Hagenbaugh & Murphy;" part of a usenet post by Tilman Hauser entitled
"Looking for info on Wollersheim."

Sunday, 10 August 1980
The Las Vegas Review Journal of August 10, 1980 publishes an account of
the OT materials. Writer of this article, Sherm Frederick, is the city
editor. He has full copies of the OT materials all of the way up through
O.T. V. Robert Vaughn Young has been sent to Las Vegas to deal with the
matter prior to publication, but the article is published anyway.
SOURCE: Denver testimony of Robert Vaughn Young, 21st day of September,
1995.

Monday, 15 c. September 1980
Quoted from Gerald Armstrong: "I [Gerald Armstrong] met Omar Carrison in
East Grinstead, England, in September of 1980. I had been sent there
especially for the encounter."
SOURCE: Gerald Armstrong as quoted in a text file: "corydon.txt," a
version of Bent Corydon's book, "Messiah or Madman," as found on the
Internet

Tuesday, 16 September 1980
Sentencing Memorandum for Jane Kember and Mo Budlong, by Assistant US
Attorney Raymond Banoun.
SOURCE: U. S. District Court, Central District Of California; Church Of
Scientology International, Plaintiffs; Steven Fishman And Uwe Geertz,
Defendants. Case No. Cv 91 6426 Hlh (tx); Declaration Of Robert Vaughn
Young; Date: April 4, 1994

Thursday, 25 September 1980
INCORPORATED:
Informed Visuals, Inc.
8335 Moorcroft Avenue
Canoga Park, CA 91304
incorporated 09/25/80 under corporate number 1025577
suspended 01/02/85
California Secretary of State
[NOTE: This corporation reportedly had Sherman Lenske's name connected
with it.]
SOURCE: Corporate Filings involving Sherman Lenske, posted anonymously
in alt.religion.scientology

Sunday, 28 c. September 1980
"On or about September 28, 1980, a meeting took place in the Cedars
Complex at Los Angeles, California, one of the corporate
headquarters of the Church of Scientology of California, (CSC). The
Meeting was attended By Charles Parcelle, (CP), Deputy Guardian for
Legal (DGL), at WW, who was in charge of all legal activities for
Scientology throughout the world and Laurel Sullivan, (LS), the
Personal representative of L Ron Hubbard, a long term senior executive
of Scientology and then In Charge, (IC), of a special legal mission,
(MCCS), which mission was seeking to conceal Hubbard's control of
Scientology and develop strategies to effectuate actual control by Mr.
Hubbard without incurring legal responsibility." [NOTE: This may or may
not be the meeting that was recorded and became known as the "Zolin
tapes."]
SOURCE: Wollersheim's app1a.txt; believed to be from Gerald Armstrong's
affidavit or declaration

Sunday, 28 September 1980
"According to an affidavit by Gerry Armstrong, a conversation was held
about September 28, 1980, in the Cedars complex, Los Angeles. Laurel
Sullivan, a top Church legal executive and an American Church attorney
were the key people present.
    "The following exchange occurred:
    "Legal executive: 'The only reason it's worked so long... is
because everyone has effectively been bound by the authority of LRH and
has ignored corporate lines. ...CSC [Church of Scientology of
California] has rendered much service to many foreign Scientologists and
RRF has got the money. ...It obviously is the classic case (loud laugh)
of inurement, if not fraud.'
    "(Several laughs)
    "'LS: "Well put.'
    "Speaker Unidentified: 'It's all privileged.'
    "Another speaker: 'The tape recorder is going here, Charles.'"
SOURCE: Text file: "corydon.txt," a version of Bent Corydon's book,
"Messiah or Madman," as found on the Internet

Sunday, 28 September 1980
Another internet version of the excerpt from what is believed to be one
of the Zolin tapes:
[UNKNOWN SPEAKER] There is no need at all for them to be the Board of
Directors in order for them to run the Church, but the authority of the
Church has to lie somewhere, and on some basis. And since the Church
has always chosen a corporate entity, eventually the authority is going
to have vest with the Board of Directors. The only reason it's worked so
long without that occurring is because everyone has effectively been
bound by the authority of LRH and have ignored corporate lines....
[CHARLES PARCELLE] We could say that the RRF, [Religious Research
Foundation], and CSC are part of the same church, even though they are
corporately different. I mean if anything was a sham corporation, it's
RRF.
[ALLEN WERTHEIMER, attorney for L Ron Hubbard] As I understand it RRF
receives monies that would otherwise be due to the California Church for
services rendered by the California Church to people outside of the
country who decide to pay the Church from outside the country.
[CHARLES PARCELLE] That's right.
[ALLEN WERTHEIMER] So that's basically right?
[CHARLES PARCELLE] That's right. Foreign - non US Scientologists pay RRF
they go to Flag [the flag Ship Org, FSO] and take the services. RRF was
originally supposed to hold the money until the service was rendered and
then pay it to CSC. But in fact it has not really done that and so CSC
has rendered much service to many foreign Scientologists and RRF has got
the money Fortunately for us RRF wasn't incorporated until 1973 and
we're litigating 1972. So I haven't really tried to sort this one out
but it obviously is the classic case (loud laugh) of inurement, if not
fraud. (several laughs)
[LAUREL SULLIVAN] Well put.
[UNKNOWN SPEAKER] It's all privileged.
[DICK SULLIVAN] The tape recorder is going here Charles....
[UNKNOWN SPEAKER] Now when you talk around a table like this and there
is no internal revenue agent present, (whispered: I hope so), bugged or
otherwise, one can work out solutions. But when you are a few weeks away
from a trial and everything you say is going to be rammed down your
throat, then you have to start looking at what actually happened. And
its very difficult to assign significances to things other than what was
actually being done at the time.
SOURCE: A text file, "Zed's Odd Doc," posted to a.r.s.

Wednesday, 01 c. October 1980
Quoted from Gerald Armstrong legal document: "In October of 1980 Mr.
(Omar) Garrison came to Los Angeles and was toured through the Hubbard
archives materials that Defendant Armstrong had assembled up to that
time."
SOURCE: Gerald Armstrong's "Appendix" for an unknown court case

Wednesday, 01 c. October 1980
Quoted from Gerald Armstrong:
    "The meeting [in England] went well and within three weeks we set
up an office for Garrison at the blue building in Los Angeles.
    "Garrison arrived in Los Angeles and signed a contract with the
Organization [which organization?] to do the biography.
    "He received twenty thousand dollars.
    "At that time, I had ready for Garrison about seven or eight
binders of material of the earliest materials that I'd found and those
were mainly the letters between Hubbard and his first wife--'the Skipper
Letters;' she went by 'Skipper' and he was called 'the Red Head.'
    "Great letters! You should see these things. They're mind bending.
But they're mainly under seal by the Court.
    "In those letters, you could just see an incredible battle building
between him and his wife: Hubbard being so...you cannot believe how
ruthless he is being in those early letters!
    "When Omar was taking over his office I was giving him materials,
and I remember thinking that I really resisted saying anything at all
about what my conclusions were at the time. I had by this time some kind
of confused thought of what the whole thing was about.
    "I remember thinking, 'I'll wait and he can look at the materials.'
I didn't know if I could talk openly to Garrison. He was completely, up
to that point, if not a died-in-the-wool advocate of Scientology, at
least a firm opponent of Scientology's enemies... ."
SOURCE: Gerald Armstrong as quoted in a text file: "corydon.txt," a
version of Bent Corydon's book, "Messiah or Madman," as found on the
Internet

Wednesday, 15 October 1980
Gerald Armstrong sends letter to Mary Sue Hubbard stating that there
were materials in the Controller Archives that would be helpful to him
in the biography research.
SOURCE: Gerald Armstrong's "Appendix" for an unknown court case

Monday, 27 October 1980
U.P.I., October 27,1980, PM cycle, by JUDI HASSON, DATELINE: WASHINGTON:
    "Two leaders of the Church of Scientology, whose legal maneuvers
prodded a federal judge to quit their case, went on trial today on
charges arising from the burglaries of government offices to obtain
documents about the church.
    "Jury selection began before U.S. District Judge Aubrey Robinson in
the case against Jane Kember and Morris Budong, extradited from Great
Britian to face a 10-count indictment.
    "...In July, lawyers for the two were successful in their efforts
to get Judge Richey removed from the case. The scientologists contended
they had tape-recorded statements from a deputy U.S. marshal and the
judge's courtroom reporter that they said showed the judge was biased
against them.
    "According to those alleged recordings, the scientologists
maintained that Richey thought church members were trying to discredit
him, and the judge wanted to handle the case only for its publicity
value.
    "But in taking himself off the case, Richey rejected those
allegations, and vigorously defended his actions. ...In October 1979,
Richey ordered the release of thousands of pages of documents seized by
the FBI in raids on the church's Los Angeles headquarters. ..."
SOURCE: U.P.I., October 27,1980

Thursday, 30 October 1980
Quoted from Gerald Armstrong legal document: "On October 30, 1980, an
agreement was entered into between Ralston-Pilot, ncv. F/S/O Omar V.
Garrison, and AOSH, DC Publications of Copenhagen, Denmark, for the
writing of biography of Hubbard."
SOURCE: Gerald Armstrong's "Appendix" for an unknown court case

Monday, 24 November 1980
U.P.I., November 24, 1980, Monday, AM cycle, by GREGORY GORDON,
DATELINE: WASHINGTON
    "The wife of Church of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard agreed
under threat of imprisonment Monday to testify at the trial of two
church leaders. Three other members refused to answer questions and were
ordered to jail.
    "U.S. District Judge Aubrey Robinson sentenced church leaders
Richard Weigand of Van Nuys, Calif., Gregory Willadson of Beverly Hills
and Henning Heldt of Los Angeles to each spend 30 days in jail or face a
$30,000 fine for refusing to testify.
    "Mary Sue Hubbard, wife of the science fiction writer who founded
the church, also sat on the witness stand for several minutes and
repeatedly said, "I decline to answer" when questioned by prosecutors.
    "But after the judge found her in criminal contempt, her lawyer,
Leonard Boudin, said she had changed her mind and would testify because
of her physical condition. He said she was suffering from hypoglycemia
-- or low blood sugar -- and other medical problems, and going to jail
would endanger her health.
    "Robinson, who immunized the four to force them to testify, said,
'It troubles the court when there is an abject refusal to testify. Can
this organization (the church) decide for itself it's above and beyond
the law? This is still an organized government. Those who choose to do
otherwise bear the responsibility.' ..."
SOURCE: U.P.I., November 24, 1980

Wednesday, 26 November 1980
The Associated Press, November 26, 1980, Wednesday, AM cycle, by H.
JOSEF HEBERT, Associated Press Writer, DATELINE: WASHINGTON
    "Two high-ranking members of the Church of Scientology were
convicted of burglary charges Wednesday in what the government has
called a widespread scheme by the church to infiltrate government
offices and steal documents.
    "The two church members, who had been extradited earlier this year
from England, were accused of ordering subordinates in Washington to
infiltrate offices of the Internal Revenue Service and the Justice
Department with aims of copying or stealing documents.
    "Jane Kember, who is a British citizen, and Morrison Budlong, an
American, stood silently and showed little emotion as the jury foreman
pronounced them guilty on all nine counts of aiding and abetting
burglary.
    "Both defendants remain free on bail while awaiting sentencing and
pending a probable appeal. The nine other church members also are free
on bail pending appeal of their convictions. U.S. District Judge Aubrey
E. Robinson set the sentencing date for Dec. 19. ..."
SOURCE: The Associated Press, November 26, 1980

Friday, 19 December 1980
The Associated Press, December 19, 1980, Friday, AM cycle, "Two
Scientology Leaders Sentenced To Jail," by JEFFREY MILLS, Associated
Press Writer, DATELINE: WASHINGTON:
    "Two high-ranking members of the Church of Scientology were each
sentenced Friday to two to six years imprisonment for burglary in what
prosecutors called a scheme to steal government documents.
    "U.S. District Court Judge Aubrey Robinson rejected requests from
Jane Kember, a British citizen who is the No. 3 ranking church official,
and her aide, Morrison Budlong, an American, to perform community
service instead of going to prison. ..."
SOURCE: The Associated Press, December 19, 1980

Thursday, 25 December 1980
Ron announces he has finished a sci-fi novel that is on its way to the
publishers (he says working title is "Man: The Endangered Species," but
it came out as "Battlefield Earth"). He also announces release of "The
Way to Happiness."
SOURCE: LRH ED 321 INT

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